Category Archives: Uncategorized

Alonso with Race Official

Alonso with Race Official (Photo credit: zpics)

Istanbul Park (Turkish: İstanbul Park), also known as the Istanbul Racing Circuit or initially Istanbul Otodrom, is a motor sports race track in Akfırat village east of Istanbul, Turkey. It was inaugurated on 21 August 2005. It has been called “the best race track in the world” by Formula One supremo Bernie Ecclestone.[1]

 

The venue of the Turkish Grand Prix is located in crossing of boundaries of Pendik and Tuzla districts on the Asian side of Istanbul, close to the junction of Kurtköy on the north side of the Otoyol 4, linking Istanbul to Ankara. It is adjacent to the newly constructed Sabiha Gökçen International Airport and is surrounded by forests and fields.

 

The Istanbul Park racing circuit was one of only five circuits running anticlockwise in the 2011 Formula One season, the others being Autódromo José Carlos Pace (used for the Brazilian Grand Prix), the Marina Bay Street Circuit (used for the Singapore Grand Prix), the Korea International Circuit (used for the Korean Grand Prix) and the Yas Marina Circuit (used for the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix). The circuit is 5.338 km (3.317 mi) long, with an average width of 15 m (49 ft) ranging from 14 to 21.5 m (46 to 70.5 ft), and covers over 2.215 million square metres (547 acres). With a total of 14 corners, the sharpest with a radius of merely 15 m (49 ft), the circuit runs over four different ground levels with a start/finish straight over 650 m (2,133 ft) in length. The total race distance of the Turkish Grand Prix is 309.356 km (192.225 mi) over 58 laps.

 

The main grandstand has a seating capacity of 25,000 spectators. In addition, natural ground stands and temporary stands can provide a total capacity of over 155,000. The paddock buildings are two-level structures; the ground floor reserved for racing teams, the upper floor serving as hospitality areas, with an additional viewing capacity of 5,000 seats. At each end of the paddock, there are two 7-story VIP towers.

 

The circuit and its facilities were designed by the well-known racetrack architect Hermann Tilke, who said he designed the track to try to catch the drivers out. The inaugural Turkish Grand Prix certainly caught the drivers out, with many drivers spinning off throughout the weekend.

Robert Kubica driving for BMW Sauber at the 20...

Robert Kubica driving for BMW Sauber at the 2009 Turkish Grand Prix. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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English: Safety car in front of garage on Ista...

English: Safety car in front of garage on Istanbul Park during 2009 Turkish Grand Prix weekend. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Istanbul Park (Turkish: İstanbul Park), also known as the Istanbul Racing Circuit or initially Istanbul Otodrom, is a motor sports race track in Akfırat village east of Istanbul, Turkey. It was inaugurated on 21 August 2005. It has been called “the best race track in the world” by Formula One supremo Bernie Ecclestone.[1]

 

The venue of the Turkish Grand Prix is located in crossing of boundaries of Pendik and Tuzla districts on the Asian side of Istanbul, close to the junction of Kurtköy on the north side of the Otoyol 4, linking Istanbul to Ankara. It is adjacent to the newly constructed Sabiha Gökçen International Airport and is surrounded by forests and fields.

 

The Istanbul Park racing circuit was one of only five circuits running anticlockwise in the 2011 Formula One season, the others being Autódromo José Carlos Pace (used for the Brazilian Grand Prix), the Marina Bay Street Circuit (used for the Singapore Grand Prix), the Korea International Circuit (used for the Korean Grand Prix) and the Yas Marina Circuit (used for the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix). The circuit is 5.338 km (3.317 mi) long, with an average width of 15 m (49 ft) ranging from 14 to 21.5 m (46 to 70.5 ft), and covers over 2.215 million square metres (547 acres). With a total of 14 corners, the sharpest with a radius of merely 15 m (49 ft), the circuit runs over four different ground levels with a start/finish straight over 650 m (2,133 ft) in length. The total race distance of the Turkish Grand Prix is 309.356 km (192.225 mi) over 58 laps.

 

The main grandstand has a seating capacity of 25,000 spectators. In addition, natural ground stands and temporary stands can provide a total capacity of over 155,000. The paddock buildings are two-level structures; the ground floor reserved for racing teams, the upper floor serving as hospitality areas, with an additional viewing capacity of 5,000 seats. At each end of the paddock, there are two 7-story VIP towers.

 

The circuit and its facilities were designed by the well-known racetrack architect Hermann Tilke, who said he designed the track to try to catch the drivers out. The inaugural Turkish Grand Prix certainly caught the drivers out, with many drivers spinning off throughout the weekend.

 

The poop deck of the Star of India, part of th...

The poop deck of the Star of India, part of the Maritime Museum of San Diego in San Diego, California. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Bush Bird Poop 1

Bush Bird Poop 1 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The poop deck of the Star of India, part of th...

The poop deck of the Star of India, part of the Maritime Museum of San Diego in San Diego, California. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A lot has been written about excessive and blatant product placement in the latest Bond movie Skyfall. But let me say something different: product placement in Skyfall wasn’t excessive and wasn’t blatant. Actually it was more subtle than I’ve expected. Mind you, we’re still talking about James Bond movie, so there is a lot of products and brands integrated in the movie, but Skyfall is no Transformers or some other examples of product placement prostitution.

When the information about Heineken’s $45 million deal (roughly a third of Skyfall’s production budget) first surfaced, there were numerous articles and blog posts about James Bond selling out. We have to be honest, though. All Bond’s movies had product placement, some were more subtle and some were more blatant when it comes to brand integration. Also, David Leigh who runs website The James Bond Dossier said, that Bond has consumed a wide variety of beverages from the start, in both in his literary and cinematic incarnations.

So, what’s the fuss?

First, let’s check products and brands from Skyfall. [POSSIBLE SPOILERS]

Cars: Landrover, Audi, Beetle, Range Rover, Jaguar and Aston Martin
Landrover Defender and Audi were seen in a car chase scene: Eve drove Landrover, while the bad guys tried to escape in Audi. During the chase a few VW Beetles fell from the train.

Range Rover was used to transport Bond to MI6’s new location and M and Bond used Jaguar XJ.

The legendary Aston Martin DB5 also made an important appearance, but I won’t reveal why 🙂

bogart III

Humphrey DeForest Bogart (December 25, 1899 – January 14, 1957)[1][2] was an American actor[3] and is widely regarded as an American cultural icon.[4][5] In 1999, the American Film Institute ranked Bogart as the greatest male star in the history of American cinema.

After trying various jobs, Bogart began acting in 1921 and became a regular in Broadway productions in the 1920s and 1930s. When the stock market crash of 1929 reduced the demand for plays, Bogart turned to film. His first great success was as Duke Mantee in The Petrified Forest (1936), and this led to a period of typecasting as a gangster with films such as Angels with Dirty Faces (1938) and B-movies like The Return of Doctor X (1939).

Bogart’s breakthrough as a leading man came in 1941, with High Sierra and The Maltese Falcon. The next year, his performance in Casablanca raised him to the peak of his profession and, at the same time, cemented his trademark film persona, that of the hard-boiled cynic who ultimately shows his noble side. Other successes followed, including To Have and Have Not (1944); The Big Sleep (1946); Dark Passage (1947) and Key Largo (1948), with his wife Lauren Bacall; The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948); In a Lonely Place (1950); The African Queen (1951), for which he won his only Academy Award; Sabrina (1954); and The Caine Mutiny (1954). His last movie was The Harder They Fall (1956). During a film career of almost 30 years, he appeared in 75 feature films.

Humphrey DeForest Bogart (December 25, 1899 – January 14, 1957)[1][2] was an American actor[3] and is widely regarded as an American cultural icon.[4][5] In 1999, the American Film Institute ranked Bogart as the greatest male star in the history of American cinema.
After trying various jobs, Bogart began acting in 1921 and became a regular in Broadway productions in the 1920s and 1930s. When the stock market crash of 1929 reduced the demand for plays, Bogart turned to film. His first great success was as Duke Mantee in The Petrified Forest (1936), and this led to a period of typecasting as a gangster with films such as Angels with Dirty Faces (1938) and B-movies like The Return of Doctor X (1939).
Bogart’s breakthrough as a leading man came in 1941, with High Sierra and The Maltese Falcon. The next year, his performance in Casablanca raised him to the peak of his profession and, at the same time, cemented his trademark film persona, that of the hard-boiled cynic who ultimately shows his noble side. Other successes followed, including To Have and Have Not (1944); The Big Sleep (1946); Dark Passage (1947) and Key Largo (1948), with his wife Lauren Bacall; The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948); In a Lonely Place (1950); The African Queen (1951), for which he won his only Academy Award; Sabrina (1954); and The Caine Mutiny (1954). His last movie was The Harder They Fall (1956). During a film career of almost 30 years, he appeared in 75 feature films.

The profound fascination of memory of past experience

and the double aspect of this fascination—^its irresistible

lure into the past with its promise of happiness and pleasure, and its threat to the kind of activity, planning, and

purposeful thought and behavior encouraged by modern

western civilization—^have attracted the thought of two men

in recent times who have made the most significant modern

contribution to the ancient questions posed by the Greek

myth: Sigmund Freud and Marcel Proust.

Both are aware of the antagonism inherent in memory,

the conflict between reviving the past and actively participating in the present life of society. Both illuminate the

nature of this conflict from different angles. Proust, the

poet of memory, is ready to renounce all that people usually

consider as active life, to renounce activity, enjoyment of

the present moment, concern with the future, friendship,

social intercourse, for the subUme happiness and profound

truth recaptured in the most elusive of all treasures that

man has hunted for, the “Remembrance of Things Past.”

He pursues this conflict between activity and memory into

its most subtle manifestations. He knows that, as the awakening dreamer may lose the memory of his dream when

he moves his limbs, opens his eyes, changes the position of

his body, so the slightest motion may endanger and dispel

the deep pleasure of the vision of the time in Combray,

recaptured by the flavor of the madeleine, or the image of

Venice conjured up by the sensation and the posture which

the unevenness of the pavement in the court of the Guermantes town house brought to him as the unevenness of

the pavement of San Marco had years ago